Rust in hose?

Stretch561

New member
Changed oil in the pump and didnt notice any water. Put new oil in and didt notice any discoloration in sight glass. I removed my chemical injector via quick connects and bypass valve a couple days ago and went to go use the pw at my house and everything was fine. Today i went to reposition a hose and disconnected o e of the quick connects and noticed rusty colored water coming from hose after the pump. Any ideas what this could be....i havent notice any leaks from pump (ez4040g) and seems to run fine. Hose and pump are a kittle iver a year.
 

ben skipworth

New member
It's probably from the chemicals rusting out the inside of your hose and fittings.
Run some water thru your injector after using it and it'll help everything last longer
 

Stretch561

New member
Thats what i was thinking. Most of my fittings are SS except a 1 after the pump but then i was thinking it was the hose as well. Thanks for the reply i appreciate it. I was getting a little worried it might be the pump. Im still gonna look into it further to see but for the most part just wanted to know what else is possible.
 

Stretch561

New member
I used myself injector with a bypass valve and would close valve to engage injector the when done and went do use surface cleaber i wouldn't open valve to get full flow. So that would be running fresh water through hose. Thats the reason i was cobfused as to where its coming from.
 

ben skipworth

New member
Inside the pump is stainless, ceramic and brass typically so nothing that is going to rust.
Just pull 1/2 a gallon of water thru the injector once your done and you should be fine
 

clean2be

New member
It's most likely the fittings on the ends of the hose. A lot of the fittings on high pressure hose are just "plated" steel. Overtime, the plating wears off and the fittings will start rusting.

When I'm just about finished a job, I place the injector line in plain water and proceed with my final rinsing with the injector pulling plain water. After a few minutes, I open the injector bypass and everything is flushed out.

Mike
 

Stretch561

New member
Thanks for the replies guys. I disd a oil change and disnt notice and rust mixture. Im going to keep a eye on it...i did notice the the hose ends a little rusty. I told my guy he should be rinsing after but god forbid they listen.
 
It takes a little extra time but I have a Ball valve on the pump side of my injector so I drop my chem hose in water tank and run it for a few then turn the valve off and remove the injector, I figure this has to increase my flow "volume" due to the small size of hole in the chem injector. Sometimes I rinse with out removing the injector if it's not too big of an area but I always remove the injector before running my surface cleaner.
Is this how you all do things?

Thanks for any input!

Pro Services
Jeb Cook
(904)206-1573
 

ben skipworth

New member
As far as removing the injector goes a lot of people have set up a injector bypass which is two tee's, a ball valve, a short piece of hose and a handful of fittings.
This way when you want to run the surface cleaner or rinse you just open the ball valve and get to it without shutting the machine down.
I'll try to find a pic for you
 
Thanks for the input, that's nice and simple fix, do you have any chemical coming through the injector, or do u take the pickup out of the tank?

Pro Services
Jeb Cook
(904)206-1573
 

clean2be

New member
When using an injector bypass, You don't need to remove the chem line from the tank. When you open the ball valve on the bypass loop, it creates too much back pressure on the injectors outlet port and therefore the injector will stop pulling chems.

Mike
 

Sirocco Jerry

Active member
Down'streamers of bleach should avoid putting chemical thru the heater..
Bleach is corrosive to the steel pipe..
Put chemical injector at the hose reel for best results anyway.
 
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