Roof Safety - Anchor points, tie offs, techniques

FTM-PTB

New member
All this talk lately about guys falling, or almost falling, or actually being saved from falling OFF the roof by their gear… its time we make a dedicated thread on this;

ROOF SAFETY
Anchor Points - Tie Off's - Rope Ops - Devices - Techinques

We all know of the dangers associated with Roof Cleaning. We also all know how often we have our gear with us, and give up quickly on using any rope, all because there is no easy solid anchor point.

Post your methods. Take some pictures.

 

FTM-PTB

New member
currently.. i have yet to tie off on a roof. AC's D-ring on pipe that goes down a flume is great.. but rarely has there ever been a roof I've cleaned yet that had a flume that was anywhere near the top of the roof, and not the bottom edges..

for shingle roofs i have considered the nail-in ridge straps you can get from HD or loses with the ring on it, and then simply pull them when the job is done and fill nail holes with roof adhesive/sealer.. fine and dandy..

but tile roofs……… watched a few videos.. no easy way out there.. you can push back the tiles, and find the joyce? never tried this.


anyone know what rope holds up best to the SH?
 

PeakOfPerfection

New member
We work with a local arborist supply house. Our lines are a composite nylon/poly. They are washed after every use...critical for longevity. You want a line that remains strong when wet, has moderate stretch, is rated to a minimum,of 5000 lb, and has good abrasion resistance. The only lines which are absolutely not applicable for our industry in my research are Cotton and Kevlar, which are both highly chlorine sensitive.

If you don't have a local supplier, try one of the online suppliers.
 

FTM-PTB

New member
heres a video of an idea I've been considering..

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Xybg_DGBf8o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 

Chris Dubbs

Member
heres a video of an idea I've been considering..

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Xybg_DGBf8o" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

I like it. Wright now I have a line on a tennis ball that I throw to pull my gun and hose up.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

PeakOfPerfection

New member
I used ACs anchors on hundreds of roofs. Worked like a charm and was cheap. Saved my and my guys asses several times.

http://youtu.be/RUUXPiUdk_U

i have one of his pipe anchors too. It has two major flaws that I have found. First, on a steep pitch, it tends to pull up from the pipe when you are on the opposite pitch. This is dangerous. I've watched it happen many times.

Second...and the most obvious...as mentioned previously, it is rare you find an ideally placed vent stack. I use the pipe anchor primarily on lower sloped single story roofs where I want to meet safety code, but don't really need to install an anchor. On anything over 1 story where we need to get on the roof, we stick with the permanent anchors. Not only can you place them ideally for the roof design, but having them be permanently installed also distinguishes and sets you apart as a professional. They meet safety code. Remember...any accident you have on your site will likely trigger a review and if you are using a non approved tie off the fine is hefty. Should anybody ever fall from a failed pipe anchor...I hope for his sake that AC has a very very hefty insurance policy.

I always tell clients the anchors we install are permanent, a one time investment in safety and will be there for the next service professional who comes along. I have never ONCE had an objection to the anchor price....ever. Clients see them as a value added service. When it comes time for the justification as to why we are worth more than the guy on Craigslist, I simply point out the fact we operate safely. It is rare we don't get the job and often times the reason the client says they chose us is because we ARE the only company they talked to who mentions safety. Remember, clients often hire you because they are scared to death of being on the roof.
 

Scott D.

Member
Can't access the video says it's private. can you free it up for general viewing???

Its public now. Sorry about that.

It just a simple 30 sec video I made years ago to show the basic use of it. Someone had said in another thread they couldnt even imagine how you'd use one, so I made it.

i have one of his pipe anchors too. It has two major flaws that I have found. First, on a steep pitch, it tends to pull up from the pipe when you are on the opposite pitch. This is dangerous. I've watched it happen many times.

Second...and the most obvious...as mentioned previously, it is rare you find an ideally placed vent stack. I use the pipe anchor primarily on lower sloped single story roofs where I want to meet safety code, but don't really need to install an anchor. On anything over 1 story where we need to get on the roof, we stick with the permanent anchors. Not only can you place them ideally for the roof design, but having them be permanently installed also distinguishes and sets you apart as a professional. They meet safety code. Remember...any accident you have on your site will likely trigger a review and if you are using a non approved tie off the fine is hefty. Should anybody ever fall from a failed pipe anchor...I hope for his sake that AC has a very very hefty insurance policy.

I always tell clients the anchors we install are permanent, a one time investment in safety and will be there for the next service professional who comes along. I have never ONCE had an objection to the anchor price....ever. Clients see them as a value added service. When it comes time for the justification as to why we are worth more than the guy on Craigslist, I simply point out the fact we operate safely. It is rare we don't get the job and often times the reason the client says they chose us is because we ARE the only company they talked to who mentions safety. Remember, clients often hire you because they are scared to death of being on the roof.

All valid points, just not ones I ever ran into.

And if someone's not mentioning their safety practices, as well as mentioning their workman's comp, they're missing a valuable sales opportunity.
 

Chris Dubbs

Member
Here is the one I use. Throw tennis ball, use the metal synch cable to pull the gun and hose up or whatever else.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

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FTM-PTB

New member
I'm all about selling the fact we will put in permanent anchors.. And that easy peezy on a shingle roof.. But my main issues is tile.. Anyone have experience sliding the tiles out of the way and installing anchors?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

PeakOfPerfection

New member
Speaking of safety...falling off the roof is one very obvious issue. But the number two places you are most likely to fall place is the ladder. Did you know that OSHA safety rules require the ladder to stick up three feet past the roof edge? Even then, transitioning from the ladder to the roof is the most dangerous point. We've all had those "moments" getting onto the ladder. While we ALL use proper ladder stabilizers/standoffs like the Ladder Max, there is still sometimes that moment. You DO use a ladder stabilizer/standoff for your ladders...RIGHT?

http://www.amazon.com/Ladder-Max-ABM-2002-Stand-off-Stabilizer/dp/B0007R6L8Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411433781&sr=8-1&keywords=ladder+max+standoff


In any case, getting on and off the roof has always been a bit of a concern. That is why I just invested in this...


Guardian Safe-T ladder extension. Allows easy ingress and egress from the roof thru the ladder rungs with a nice place to grab on to. No more transitioning sideways. It also automatically meets the OSHA guideline so if you happen to get inspected, at least that is one things you won't get dinged for. $149 at Amazon.com, well worth the cost.
 

PeakOfPerfection

New member
I'm all about selling the fact we will put in permanent anchors.. And that easy peezy on a shingle roof.. But my main issues is tile.. Anyone have experience sliding the tiles out of the way and installing anchors?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

My recommendation is to do what I did...hire an experienced roof contractor to train you on removing/replacing tiles and installing safety anchors. It is extremely rare we get any roofs with tiles here so when we run across them, we just hit them from a ladder or lift.

The other option is to simply hire a roofer to install them for you. They get the advantage of a customer contact and laying eyes on the roof for any cracked tile/flashing/vent repairs plus the money to install the anchors. You get to sell safety. Both parties win.
 

AC Lockyer

New member
currently.. i have yet to tie off on a roof. AC's D-ring on pipe that goes down a flume is great.. but rarely has there ever been a roof I've cleaned yet that had a flume that was anywhere near the top of the roof, and not the bottom edges..

for shingle roofs i have considered the nail-in ridge straps you can get from HD or loses with the ring on it, and then simply pull them when the job is done and fill nail holes with roof adhesive/sealer.. fine and dandy..

but tile roofs……… watched a few videos.. no easy way out there.. you can push back the tiles, and find the joyce? never tried this.


anyone know what rope holds up best to the SH?

Thanks for the mention.

AC
 

AC Lockyer

New member
Speaking of safety...falling off the roof is one very obvious issue. But the number two places you are most likely to fall place is the ladder. Did you know that OSHA safety rules require the ladder to stick up three feet past the roof edge? Even then, transitioning from the ladder to the roof is the most dangerous point. We've all had those "moments" getting onto the ladder. While we ALL use proper ladder stabilizers/standoffs like the Ladder Max, there is still sometimes that moment. You DO use a ladder stabilizer/standoff for your ladders...RIGHT?

http://www.amazon.com/Ladder-Max-ABM-2002-Stand-off-Stabilizer/dp/B0007R6L8Q/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1411433781&sr=8-1&keywords=ladder+max+standoff


In any case, getting on and off the roof has always been a bit of a concern. That is why I just invested in this...


Guardian Safe-T ladder extension. Allows easy ingress and egress from the roof thru the ladder rungs with a nice place to grab on to. No more transitioning sideways. It also automatically meets the OSHA guideline so if you happen to get inspected, at least that is one things you won't get dinged for. $149 at Amazon.com, well worth the cost.

I like these whole bunches!

AC
 

junker1

Roundtable Host 2009
mccurdy standish maine 004.JPG

how would you put a ladder on this roof ? It is only a foot off the ground and I need to stain the side of the building.
 
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