Pumps, Bypass and Unloaders... HELP!

CL Scott

New member
Ok, so someone pointed out my current bypass, the top right, is not the correct bypass. My question is how should I adjust my setup?

Question #1:

From what I think and have heard, do I run the bypass outlet to the tank and plug the bottom right and top right?

Question #2:

Can I plug the bottom left inlet and use the right inlet on the bottom? See Slide 5

Slide1.JPGSlide2.JPGSlide3.JPG Slide4.JPGSlide5.JPG
 

up-power

New member
Keep your water inlet and the high pressure outlet. Plug the rest. Take the line from your unloader labeled bypass and send that to the top of the tank. I would personally suggest an unloader block to mount it to.
 

CL Scott

New member
Keep your water inlet and the high pressure outlet. Plug the rest. Take the line from your unloader labeled bypass and send that to the top of the tank. I would personally suggest an unloader block to mount it to.

First, thanks for the help. I don't know which I'm more curious about, why the unloader block, or what is an unloader block. Second [REALLY IMPORTANT], is it safe to change the water inlet from left to right?
 

CL Scott

New member
Water inlets are universal, heck most high GPM setups get both pipped.

This pump is 4gpm @ 3000 psi. If I connected both, would it help - or not make a difference?
 

Ralph Q

New member
from my research, bypass hose from unloader goes to top of tank. The other one is plugged or a pressure relief valve installed. Inlets are interchangable, If possible flood both inlets with water. A block is just a remote unloader setup. Instead of off the pump, you position the unloader where it is out of the way or more convenient.

This pump is 4gpm @ 3000 psi. If I connected both, would it help - or not make a difference?

It couldn't hurt. Insurance from cavitation. You really don't need that other inlet, so why not feed the pump?
 

Johnson

New member
First, thanks for the help. I don't know which I'm more curious about, why the unloader block, or what is an unloader block. Second [REALLY IMPORTANT], is it safe to change the water inlet from left to right?

This is an unloader block

http://www.pressuretek.com/unloaderblocks.html

It's easier on the unloader to have it mounted on a block. Honestly I wouldn't worry with an unloader block. I dont see the room for it anyway on your setup. Not a huge deal. The industrial hot water units come equipped with them standard.
You can use whichever side you want on the water inlet.
 

CL Scott

New member
from my research, bypass hose from unloader goes to top of tank. The other one is plugged or a pressure relief valve installed. Inlets are interchangable, If possible flood both inlets with water. A block is just a remote unloader setup. Instead of off the pump, you position the unloader where it is out of the way or more convenient.



It couldn't hurt. Insurance from cavitation. You really don't need that other inlet, so why not feed the pump?

Ill simplify my response by saying having both connected sure can't hurt.... At the very least its a failsafe

This is an unloader block

http://www.pressuretek.com/unloaderblocks.html

It's easier on the unloader to have it mounted on a block. Honestly I wouldn't worry with an unloader block. I dont see the room for it anyway on your setup. Not a huge deal. The industrial hot water units come equipped with them standard.
You can use whichever side you want on the water inlet.

It clicked! Finally making sense... Thanks.
 

Russ Johnson

Equipment Expert
The line at the top right is hooked to your easy start valve. It allows you to start the engine without pulling the trigger. Plumbing it to the tank is fine.

The unloader bypass is the black rubber hose. It can also go to your tank. You could then feed both inlet ports on the pump. You need to replace the steel inlet fittings with brass or plastic. Steel will rust and get into your valves.
 

tomtucson

New member
I was wondering what that was coming from the high pressure out to a poly hose. Is there any downside with the easy start valve? Get rid of the steel even the outlet tee - stainless rules. Pressure relief valve before unloader. I completely quick connected my unloaders and it's great.
 

CL Scott

New member
The line at the top right is hooked to your easy start valve. It allows you to start the engine without pulling the trigger. Plumbing it to the tank is fine.

The unloader bypass is the black rubber hose. It can also go to your tank. You could then feed both inlet ports on the pump. You need to replace the steel inlet fittings with brass or plastic. Steel will rust and get into your valves.

Running the bypass to the tank, can't I plug the easy start outlet?
 

Christopher

Moderator
I was wondering what that was coming from the high pressure out to a poly hose. Is there any downside with the easy start valve? Get rid of the steel even the outlet tee - stainless rules. Pressure relief valve before unloader. I completely quick connected my unloaders and it's great.

Working on installing the second unloader on my Hotsy so no more changing the pressure with the unloaders and for many applications, just changing the nozzles is not enough and then have to re-tune the machine for other applications is a pita. The second unloader with qc's will be great.
 

CL Scott

New member
Put the pressure relief valve where the easy start was

Hey Tom (or anyone who understands), why would that be better than leaving it plumbed to the tank?

And if I move it, what goes on the other side?
 

FCPWLLC

Senior Moderator
Also, remember to direct the bypass flow into tank AWAY from tanks outlet. The disturbance can create air bubbles. Don't want any air bubbles going into pump.
 

Sirocco Jerry

Active member
good point Mike..
position unloader bypass line to not cause turbulence w/air bubbles where the pump is sucking water from the tank.
think about return line positioning and other idea come to mind as well..
that Easy-Start valve.. yea they fail at a year or two,
but for the guys that need to run longer hoses, or that "climb on things" (scaffolding, heavy equipoment, etc.)..
..the EasyStart function is a cool tool and allows your starter to last longer.
But position the return line back to the water tank in a position where you can see inside the tank,
..if it is bleeding when the gun is open, as it has failed.
position the unloader bypass the same..
..If you loose pressure, and something's bleeding.. you need to know QUICKLY !

Ease of access and troubleshooting is the core of my troubleshooting & bulletproofing class.

..another thing..
keep steel fittings AWAY from the inlets of your pump systems..

use brass fittings with WIDE-OPEN openings for the best possible flow..
And even a pump with wimpy seals can last a reasonably long life.
Think "easy" reliability, easy maintenance, and less rust floating through your check valves.
Eh?
 

CL Scott

New member
Also, remember to direct the bypass flow into tank AWAY from tanks outlet. The disturbance can create air bubbles. Don't want any air bubbles going into pump.

I got that from one of your videos. Thanks Mike! (Like the hose reel set up? - "Borrowed that too!)



good point Mike..
position unloader bypass line to not cause turbulence w/air bubbles where the pump is sucking water from the tank.
think about return line positioning and other idea come to mind as well..
that Easy-Start valve.. yea they fail at a year or two,
but for the guys that need to run longer hoses, or that "climb on things" (scaffolding, heavy equipoment, etc.)..
..the EasyStart function is a cool tool and allows your starter to last longer.
But position the return line back to the water tank in a position where you can see inside the tank,
..if it is bleeding when the gun is open, as it has failed.
position the unloader bypass the same..
..If you loose pressure, and something's bleeding.. you need to know QUICKLY !

Ease of access and troubleshooting is the core of my troubleshooting & bulletproofing class.

..another thing..
keep steel fittings AWAY from the inlets of your pump systems..

use brass fittings with WIDE-OPEN openings for the best possible flow..
And even a pump with wimpy seals can last a reasonably long life.
Think "easy" reliability, easy maintenance, and less rust floating through your check valves.
Eh?

Thanks Jerry. Looking to speak with you at the convention!
 
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