Insulated access panels

RJTravel

Member
I have always have trouble with insulated access panels - like those found over the hood in a split duct. Often we find the 3 to 4 inches of insulation neatly attached with bolt support. I am seldom able to put it back as we found it. Sometimes (like last night) the insulation was so laden with grease I simply threw it out and replaced the panel sans insulation. What do you do? Do you put this on the exit report, or simply forget about it?

Tnx, Richard
 

RJTravel

Member
Bryan,
Yes, however this system appeared to be custom fabricated. Not well sealed and leaked profusely. As far as I know the intent of the heavy insulation is to suppress noise, reduce vibration and heat transfer. I removed the grease which had leaked and the greasy insulation itself, sealed and tightened as well as able, and placed a layer of grease absorbent. My concern is two-fold, if I don't report the next HVAC guy will blame me for careless work, if I do draw to their attention I will be expected to foot the bill. You know the dilemma - there is no trust in nor loyalty given to the lowly hood cleaner and we are the easy mark.
 

kmjt1021

Member
I don't see how you could be blamed for leaky ducts or improperly installed access panels. I would have showed someone (if at all possible) before I did any work. I don't think I would have removed the insulation, even grease soaked insulation. If they have a fire they will see no insulation at all and ask where did it go? The hood guy removed it!
Show the problem to the manager/owner whenever possible, make recommendation, gets names and signature's of people you reported to.
I know removing the grease soaked insulation seams like the thing to do, in today’s world you never know.
 

David Saulque

Senior Moderator
We serviced a Sonic last week. First service and as far as I know the first one in Northern California. The Unit has been open for nine months and this was the first cleaning.

The grill had a elbow at the grill with a access door with wrap insulation. My crew didn't detect the door until the cleaning the vertical along with the leaking door. The door was on the bottom of the elbow lateral. What a mess, now because the AHJ has signed off, the store thinks that it is my problem.

He now knows after talking with me he has the problem, not me. I am requiring him to weld the door and place a new door on the side of the elbow as per 96. Plus the removal of grease laden insulation. In the long run this is the best option.

The elbow makes no sense, it is a straight shot with no limitations like walls, roofline and so on. I didn't detect the elbow on the estimate.
 

David Saulque

Senior Moderator
90 degree off the hood 3 feet then vertical. Access door on the bottom of the 3 foot section. Here you can go vertical from the hood-you can see the filters at the fan or a short elbow to vertical.
 
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