Hot water temperature

Chris Dubbs

Member
I don't turn the heat on for residential unless they have oil stained concrete.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 

Pat Norman

New member
High heat on wood is a no-no. Like said I only use heat on greasy, oily, gum or spilled paint or tar on concrete. Some here use low heat 110-120 on house washes. I do not unless its winter and the low heat helps the sodium hypochlorite work faster with less applications on heavy mold/mildew.
 

Christopher

Moderator
I think you need to spend some time reading so you don't go out and accidentally damage something.

Never use hot water on wood, vinyl, and most other house and building surfaces.

It is very easy to cause many hundreds or thousands of dollars in damages by not knowing what you are doing.

There are a lot of great info here in the forums, check it out as there are many years of great questions and answers from professionals with many years experience here to help you out.
 
Great information, I currently do not own a hot water setup, but am interested in getting one for commercial work. Just was wondering if I would be using for residential as well. Looks like that's a big no. Thanks
 

jeffnc226

New member
You can warp vinyl at 115'.

When you're looking at houses, keep an eye on vinyl siding in the vicinity of a grill. The grill doesn't have to be that close. Heat + vinyl = bad. It's not even a great choice for your house if you simply live in a very hot climate.
 

Chris Dubbs

Member
Not to mention, I forgot to say a " Hot " hose in the yard is a no no. Hot hoses will kill grass, and leave the dreaded yellow snake impression.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk HD
 
Top