Foamer -vs- Downstream -vs- Pump sprayer for KEC

FTM-PTB

New member
in regards to laying your degreaser..

-what do you all do/use?
-whats best method of application for such chemical/KEC type jobs?
-can you use cling-on or other surfactant with degreasers?

thoughts, tips, advice... all are welcome. PLEASE and THANK YOU


for some quick background, while im learning KEC and working to better my practice, so far the pump sprayer with 1:5 (industrial degreaser:water) has been minimally effective.. dwell time is terrible, just runs off.. end up cleaning with pressure vs letting the chem work.. tried 1:2 mix, anddddd no change.. need more time
 

Ron Musgraves

Exterior Restoration Specialist
Staff member
Grants down right now, might take him a bit to answer


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Paul Kassander

New member
The cleaning agent will make the biggest difference. Some hood grease just needs a special mix to get it off. Foaming helps a lot to make the product stick and dwell but if the detergent is no good dwell time means nothing. Also remember dwell time on grease is more for penetration to loosen and release it from the surface so it is easier to clean, foam allows the product to it on the surface longer without drying out which can be beneficial as well. Each method you mentioned is good for various applications, you just may need to pick and choose which is best and fastest for the job.
 

jdc491

New member
Paul is spot on.

I do KEC work every night, and depending on what is needing to be cleaned I will use all 3 methods you mentioned.

What type of places are you cleaning that you are having trouble with? (broiler hoods at a burger king? the hoods over the grill line at a applebees?)

We run machines with a built in soap injector which draws from out soap container which contains our degreaser mix. (roughly 1:3 degreaser/water). That paired with heat and some pressure is usually enough to clean what is needed. However when it isn't I will pull out the good old pump up sprayer with a nasty mix in it, lay down a coat on the tough areas and that will do the trick.

Maybe you should re-visit your degreasing agent and see if it is up to par with what type of work you are attempting.
 

FTM-PTB

New member
Excellent info guys thank you. I practiced on a used hood that bought and seemed to be from a typical bar/grill type restaurant.. Definitely not Chinese.. As far as chemical, it was something someone picked up for me to try from a local chemical supplier. I know it was acid based? I think?.. I'll have to find the MSDS sheet with the name.


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Christopher

Moderator
Excellent info guys thank you. I practiced on a used hood that bought and seemed to be from a typical bar/grill type restaurant.. Definitely not Chinese.. As far as chemical, it was something someone picked up for me to try from a local chemical supplier. I know it was acid based? I think?.. I'll have to find the MSDS sheet with the name.


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You really should read the msds of every chemical you have before using it, here you are stating that you don't know if it is an acid or not, mixing acids and other chemicals can easily be a DEADLY experiment, not professional at all and you can easily injure/kill others with you by doing this nonsense.

I would stop what you are doing and start reading before you hurt or kill yourself and/or others in the same area.

You need to take this stuff very serious because besides possibly hurting or killing yourself you can also damage thousands and thousands of dollars in property that is not yours and will not be covered by your insurance if it happens, they will go after your business and family besides the people you hurt.

This not meant to be mean, this is meant to open your eyes to using chemicals properly and it is very obvious that you are not even trying since you don't know what you are doing or what you are using since you don't read the paperwork. Start reading.
 

FTM-PTB

New member
I never said I was mixing any chemicals. I know that what I used was a corrosive. And I Did read the MSDS 2 weeks ago when I did the job. Before you speculate and accuse, ask questions. I did not go mixing acids or do any other irresponsible action that you assume I did.

I appreciate your advise and am all ears, but don't pass judgment on what you think happened or the kind of professional I am.


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Christopher

Moderator
If you don't read your msds then you are not being safe in other words, read your msds like you mentioned you would do and then you will be safe.

You mentioned that you did not know if a chemical was an acid or not, that is why you need to read your msds before using it so you don't use it and realize it is not working and then add a degreaser or other chemical to the surface improperly and cause a seriously bad reaction.

Don't use acids with other chemicals in other words don't mix chemicals, know what you are using first before you do anything so you keep yourself and others and property safe at all times.
 

Ron Musgraves

Exterior Restoration Specialist
Staff member
 
All I use so far are 2gallon pump up sprayers filled with Sodium Hydroxide and a fan nozzle on the wand. I usually mix 2 dry cups of Sodium Hydroxide per 1 gallon of water. Sometimes I mix Dawn Ultra or Gain Ultra. The surfactants in either are strong enough to survive the ph of Sodium Hydroxide. The pump up sprayers cost me 11 bucks or so with a coupon. I want to get a foamer.. but eh... its working so far. Problem I run into with my sprayers is that the fiber glass tube for the wand ends up dissolving around the O-rind location and then it leaks like the Niagra Falls, enough to hospitalize anyone who holds it above shoulder height where it will run down your arm. Not good. But none the less they are still effective for roughly 15-20jobs.

If I buy a lance end foamer attachment, it will likely be a stainless steel material if nothing else, lafferty?
 

FTM-PTB

New member
Why sodium hydroxide vs just chlorine? I have yet to try hydroxide. Been happy with results from hypochlorite


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Entretien SG

New member
Why sodium hydroxide vs just chlorine? I have yet to try hydroxide. Been happy with results from hypochlorite


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The best chemicals to use in KEC are sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide... Chlorine is not for this task, it works great on a lot of things but not grease, or this type of grease... Personaly, I'm using sodium hydroxide and it works great and has for years now...
 

Entretien SG

New member
All I use so far are 2gallon pump up sprayers filled with Sodium Hydroxide and a fan nozzle on the wand. I usually mix 2 dry cups of Sodium Hydroxide per 1 gallon of water. Sometimes I mix Dawn Ultra or Gain Ultra. The surfactants in either are strong enough to survive the ph of Sodium Hydroxide. The pump up sprayers cost me 11 bucks or so with a coupon. I want to get a foamer.. but eh... its working so far. Problem I run into with my sprayers is that the fiber glass tube for the wand ends up dissolving around the O-rind location and then it leaks like the Niagra Falls, enough to hospitalize anyone who holds it above shoulder height where it will run down your arm. Not good. But none the less they are still effective for roughly 15-20jobs.

If I buy a lance end foamer attachment, it will likely be a stainless steel material if nothing else, lafferty?

I'm only using a pump-up sprayers as well but after the first year that I've went through 5-6 cheap sprayers I've decided to pay a little more and get better equipment... I'm using an ECHO 3 gallons sprayers and it still works fine after almost 250 jobs, of course it needs some love sometimes. I took it apart clean and grease every o'rings and than were good to go for another run!

When you're using Dawn or Gain does it foam a little or it just cling better to the surface? The only time I've tried with Dawn it did not make any difference...probably not enough Dawn for the quantity of SH?
 
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