fall protection

James Pop

New member
Hey guys,
I see some threads concerning fall protection but none seem to provide what I think is an obvious answer. Would it be simple to drive a 2 or 3 foot stake in the ground on the opposite side of the house to tie off. Or, tie off to stationary object? I would think HOs would like that better then nailing into the structure. While checking out threads I saw a vid of a guy tying off on the rim of a car. Surely, that is not a good idea. Thanks.

James
 

junker1

Roundtable Host 2009
well its not a good idea if someone drives the car away, but I don't see why its a bad idea other than that. sure tie off safely any way you can
 

mistersqueegee

New member
First you need to choose between fall arrest and restraint. In restraint situations you have to be kept 6ft from the roof edge. In arrest there are specific load requirements for your tie off choices.


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DontRevMe

New member
I just think its a hassle to try and cover the area of a roof, then go back down to move your tie off point based on where you are on the roof.
 

James Pop

New member
So, would driving a 2' or 3' stake in the ground be sufficient to tie off on? You could actually drive one on each side of the structure so all you'll need to do is change lines when switching from one side to the other.
 

JBurd

New member
So, would driving a 2' or 3' stake in the ground be sufficient to tie off on? You could actually drive one on each side of the structure so all you'll need to do is change lines when switching from one side to the other.

I'm no expert but I would say a wooden stake would not be sufficient, maybe steel. Is driving a stake 3' into the ground even manageable without a sledge?
 

mistersqueegee

New member
Seems like it might work Al. I'd check with OSHA before letting an employee use it though. Hate to get a fine when you thought you were being safe.


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AC Lockyer

New member
Hey guys,
I see some threads concerning fall protection but none seem to provide what I think is an obvious answer. Would it be simple to drive a 2 or 3 foot stake in the ground on the opposite side of the house to tie off. Or, tie off to stationary object? I would think HOs would like that better then nailing into the structure. While checking out threads I saw a vid of a guy tying off on the rim of a car. Surely, that is not a good idea. Thanks.

James

OSHA doesn't really care what you use along as it meets the standard. Even a tree can be rated. The law is 2.5 times the impact load for fall positioning. For fall arrest I believe it is still 3,000 pounds. Likely a stake in the ground will not rate that way. However those cool manufactured housing anchors would work and are actually rated because of wind storm laws.

AC
 

Saltstorm

New member
I have been reading all of your posts and I can tell that there is a real effort going on to establish a tangible plan to provide forfall protection for cleaning pitched roofing systems. My name is Kevin Kramer and I am the Owner and Program Director of Reality Rope Access LLC AND coincidently the lead chair holder regarding “Pitched Roof Structure Access”for SPRAT’s (Society for Professional Rope Access Technicians) Committee onBuildings and Urban Development.

May Be I can Assist In Answering Some of Your Questions:
Question # 1 What is OSHA Regulation for fall protection while working on pitched roofing structures?:
This is a very broad question with many possible answersdepending what and who you apply it to that begins with no regulations what-so-ever for those of you who provide the labor for your own businesses (OSHAregulations are reserved for the workplace safety regarding employees but has nothing to do with the fall risk a business owner exposes their selves to).
OSHA regulations for anchor strength depends on what kind offall protection you are using:
Personal Fall ArrestSystems – those which allow a worker enough slack to step over a leading edge where they could fall up to 6ft (but no more) require 5000lb anchors.
Work PositioningSystems – which allow a worker to free-fall up to 2ft (but no more) require 3000lb anchors.
Fall RestraintSystems – rope or lanyard based systems that are set up in such a way as to prevent a leading edge fall all-together (i.e. prevent a worker from access overa leading edge) require 1000 lb anchors.
Question # 2 Yourplumbing jack / pipe anchor looks real handy BUT… How do you protect the guywho sets it in place from a fall?:
With a First Man Up Fall Protection System – A system of fall protection that can be set-up /put in place by a worker, without any exposure to the risk of a fall. These systems include a projectile, a tag line for pulling ropes into place and asuitable anchor (either structural or weight based / portable). Such a system is available and can be used on structures that are 10+ stories tall.
Question # 3 Where can I find a self-trailing rope grab?:
NO SUCH TOOL EXISTS! Please understand that YES there issuch a tool called a self-trailing rope grab (e.g. the Kong “Back-Up” or theYates “Rocker”) But No Rope Grab (neither self-trailing type nor ascendingtype) will Self Trail as they all require a great deal of hand manipulation.<o:p></o
FURTHERMORE.
ROPE GRABS ARE EXTREMELY DANGEROUS!!! Especially in the hands of an untrained professional and should NEVER be used alone as a fall protection device. Rope grabs are easily defeated by human hands due to acondition known as “Panic Grip”<o:p></o
“Panic Grip” - the human reflex type tendency to counter the feelings of lost control experienced in the early stages of a fall by indiscriminately grabbing and holding onto objects within their immediate reach.
For this reason alone, many if not most rope access training companies refuse to use them. If you choose to use one then I would suggestattaching them to a Y-Lanyard with a Jumar / Hand-held ascender.
 
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