Belts

Scott Stone

New member
There are typically two different types of belts on pressure washers. AX belts are the cogged belts. They seem to last longer because the cogs allow them to flex more as they go around the pulleys. BX Belts are the solid belts. The sheaves (the pulley) are designed for each type of belt, and there is a lot that goes into the proper sizing of a belt. If you are in a pinch, you can go to a big box hardware store and find replacement belts. The problem with that is finding the belt with the proper width, and the proper angle to go into the sheave, and not throw the belt.
I buy my belts at a local Bearing Belt and chain store. It is amazing to me, but these guys know belts, and only sell quality stuff.
When you are adjusting the belts to prepare your equipment, or repair your equipment, you need to pay attention to a couple of things, usually, in order to make sure that they are properly adjusted. First is how much flex that they have when under load.
In order to install belts on any piece of equipment there are a few things that you need to do.
1. Make sure that the belts are the proper length. The outside of the belt should be at the edge of the sheave or pulley, so that it is flat.
2. Make sure that the V-Section in the groove is the same. If they are not the same you have the wrong belts and they will wear quicker.
3. Make sure the sheaves are aligned. If you are able to make the belts work, they will wear out more quickly.
4. Clean the interior of the sheaves so that there is no residual rust, dust, or rubber in them to potentially damage he belt
5. If you have multiple belts, and I have not seen a pressure washer that didn't have multiple belts, replace both at the same time, and preferably from the same lot.
6. Make sure the sheave is solid and does not having missing parts, is not cracked or broken.
7. Loosen the bolts of the adjustable side of whatever you are mounting it on, usually the pump, and slide it so that there is total slack in the old belt, or is adjusted all the way in. Do not use a tool to work the belt onto the sheave. It will break internal cords and damage the exterior of the belt.
8. When you adjust the belt to tighten it, the ratio is you should have enough deflection to get 1/64" per inch of travel between the pulleys. That means, if you measure between the center of the pulley on your pump, and the center of the pulley on your machine, and there is 64 inches, you get one inch of deflection. If there is 32 inches, it is a half inch, and if it is 16 inches, you get all of the mighty quarter inch.
9. After you have adjusted the belts, made sure that you have the proper tension, and that everything is in alignment so that they belts do not have a little bend in them as they come off the pulley, you can tighten down the retaining nuts, and start the machine to make sure there is no slipping. If you really want to get high tech, you can get a timing light, like they used to use to tune cars, and put a mark on the belts, and start the machine, to make sure the belt is not slipping.
 

Benjamin

New member
A few things are wrong with the original belt info.

"A" or "B" is a size "A" is Top width-1/2", Depth-5/16" and "B" is Top width-21/32", Depth-13/32".

You have different pulley's that work with the different belts. "A" belts are typically found on cars/trucks and "B" belts are typically considered industrial belts. Most pressure washers have a "B" belts.

The "X" after the "A,B" is the what defines the belt as conventional vs cogged.

Since I build all my own pressure washers I have had to learn the differences and have made a few mistakes in the process.
 

Scott Stone

New member
Benjamin is absolutely right. Bx belts are a little wider than ax belts. Although all my machines sport ax belts
That's what I get for not carefully proofing something after I write it. Nice catch Benjamin!
 

Sirocco Jerry

Active member
V-Belts.. defined

...actually.. for a little better definition.. and adding the "L" series.

L series are considered lighter duty
..examples..
4L are 1/2" wide, 5/16” thick (same as A belts, but less reinforcement.
5L are 21/32" wide, 3/8” thick
(12/32”) ..and “ “

A & B series are industrial duty,
..examples..
A are 1/2" wide, 5/16” thick same as 4L’s but more reinforcement.
B are 21/32”wide,
13/32” thick and more reinforcement.

AX and BX versions are same as above,
..but.. Cogged, for better grip.

5VX series are SuperDuty cogged belts, upgrade from BX’s..
..these are 17/32” thick for tremendous grip.
 

Christopher

Moderator
I was recently told at the belt supply house when asking for a matched set that they are made so good these days that they no longer make matched sets.

Not sure if they were bs'ing me or not, anyone know the truth about this as of recently?
 

clean2be

New member
They were BS'ing you! I just replaced both Browning Cog belts on my machine back in June. I purchased a third belt just as a spare. When the belts arrived, I ended up using that third belt to go with the first belt and I specifically asked to be shipped belts which were manufactured in the same line. All three belts had a different production line number and the second belt had a ton of slack once the first had taken up.
 

Sirocco Jerry

Active member
Not getting belts from the same batch can be early failure..
Always try to get belts from the same batch. Not just the same brand.
..In fact..

If you should order 3 belts, and they say “2 are here, another will come from another store”
.. tell’em
.. "Please get all 3 from the other store, ..and I need to check dateCodes

.. toBeSure they are from the same batch.”

 

Ron Musgraves

Exterior Restoration Specialist
Staff member
There are typically two different types of belts on pressure washers. AX belts are the cogged belts. They seem to last longer because the cogs allow them to flex more as they go around the pulleys. BX Belts are the solid belts. The sheaves (the pulley) are designed for each type of belt, and there is a lot that goes into the proper sizing of a belt. If you are in a pinch, you can go to a big box hardware store and find replacement belts. The problem with that is finding the belt with the proper width, and the proper angle to go into the sheave, and not throw the belt.
I buy my belts at a local Bearing Belt and chain store. It is amazing to me, but these guys know belts, and only sell quality stuff.
When you are adjusting the belts to prepare your equipment, or repair your equipment, you need to pay attention to a couple of things, usually, in order to make sure that they are properly adjusted. First is how much flex that they have when under load.
In order to install belts on any piece of equipment there are a few things that you need to do.
1. Make sure that the belts are the proper length. The outside of the belt should be at the edge of the sheave or pulley, so that it is flat.
2. Make sure that the V-Section in the groove is the same. If they are not the same you have the wrong belts and they will wear quicker.
3. Make sure the sheaves are aligned. If you are able to make the belts work, they will wear out more quickly.
4. Clean the interior of the sheaves so that there is no residual rust, dust, or rubber in them to potentially damage he belt
5. If you have multiple belts, and I have not seen a pressure washer that didn't have multiple belts, replace both at the same time, and preferably from the same lot.
6. Make sure the sheave is solid and does not having missing parts, is not cracked or broken.
7. Loosen the bolts of the adjustable side of whatever you are mounting it on, usually the pump, and slide it so that there is total slack in the old belt, or is adjusted all the way in. Do not use a tool to work the belt onto the sheave. It will break internal cords and damage the exterior of the belt.
8. When you adjust the belt to tighten it, the ratio is you should have enough deflection to get 1/64" per inch of travel between the pulleys. That means, if you measure between the center of the pulley on your pump, and the center of the pulley on your machine, and there is 64 inches, you get one inch of deflection. If there is 32 inches, it is a half inch, and if it is 16 inches, you get all of the mighty quarter inch.
9. After you have adjusted the belts, made sure that you have the proper tension, and that everything is in alignment so that they belts do not have a little bend in them as they come off the pulley, you can tighten down the retaining nuts, and start the machine to make sure there is no slipping. If you really want to get high tech, you can get a timing light, like they used to use to tune cars, and put a mark on the belts, and start the machine, to make sure the belt is not slipping.


Belt Bearing and Chain is the best, the guy who Started the Advance Cyclone Machine works There !!!!
 
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